Author Topic: One less guided busway in the UK  (Read 1674 times)

Offline barryb

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One less guided busway in the UK
« on: September 27, 2008, 11:39:49 PM »

Offline Suzy Scott

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Re: One less guided busway in the UK
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2008, 08:37:34 AM »
I thought the route of FastTrack (if that's the correct name off the top of my head) was originally meant for CERT? (City of Edinburgh Rapid Transit?)

Didn't First initally win the project, and then complain Lothian had improved parallel services to try and elbow them out?
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Offline barryb

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Re: One less guided busway in the UK
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2008, 08:04:58 PM »
FastLink was previously WEBS, which was previously CERT.  CERT was originally supposed to go beyond the Gyle to the Airport and Riccarton (and possibly Livingston), and was also to be built with the possibility of conversion to light rail in mind.   Services would have been operated by First, the new park and ride car parks at the airport by Central Parking, and it would have been built by Balfour Beatty and funded by Abbey National.  It would also have connected with a new railway station on an existing line in the airport area.

It didn't have a smooth run through the planning process and took a long time to look like it was getting anywhere.  By then Lothian had improved airport services from every 45 mins day and early evening to every 7/8 mins day and 30 mins all night, the Gyle had services to every 2 / 3 mins, and the park and ride car park was open and being served by Lothian with conventional buses.  At the point it was also not looking like the railway station would be built and that the airport would instead get a dedicated line with station at the terminal. 

It was however the definite intention of the council that the tram line should go ahead, and first pulling out CERT was seen as a blow to these proposals as it increased the cost of the trams (the structures for the off road sections wouldn't already be in place).

By the time WEBS (which was a smallish bit of the middle of the airport CERT route, excluding the link to the airport and the most contentious off road section) actually got the go ahead (now funded by the council and operated by Lothian) it had already been decided that it would be converted to the tram line a few years after completion.

There were plans for a second guideway on a proposed tram route in the south of Edinburgh.  However that tram line was dependent on income from congestion charging, and once it was clear neither were going ahead the desire to build the guideway quickly vanished as well.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2008, 08:10:30 PM by barryb »